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Cinnamon-Kissed Banana Chocolate Chip Pancakes

9 Mar

How’s that for a title?

This came about because of the two browning bananas in my refrigerator and my (temporary) disinterest in banana bread. And a school holiday when we slept late and craved something a bit more substantial than the normal racing-out-the-door, five minutes at the kitchen island breakfast. I wanted banana pancakes, but most recipes were pretty much normal pancake batter with slices of fruit added on the griddle. Which wasn’t what I wanted at all; I wanted pancakes that tasted like banana all the way through.

I doctored up this recipe that seems to be all over the internets, and it is delicious. Be sure you cook them all the way through–they take a few extra minutes more than plain pancakes. Also, be sure to mash up your banana really well. I used my handy-dandy potato masher to squish them up with the butter, egg, and milk in a bowl, and then a whisk to finish the job. You could use an electric mixer or a blender, too.

This recipe made eight pancakes. We ate four and popped the leftovers in the freezer for another morning (hot breakfast without the mess tomorrow–score!). They are quite banana-ey, so you won’t need much syrup at all (less sugar–another score!). And despite my children screwing up their noses at the thought of fruit inside their flapjacks, they loved the final result and scarfed down their meal in no time flat. Sweet.

These are super easy. You need:

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 tbsp sugar

2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1 egg

1 cup milk

2 tbsp melted butter

2 brown bananas

Chocolate chips

Preheat your griddle over medium heat.

In a large bowl, whisk together your dry ingredients (up to and including cinnamon).

In another bowl, mash together your wet stuff (everything else except chocolate chips) until it’s well combined and only a few banana lumps remain.

Dump the wet stuff into the dry stuff and gently stir together until it’s combined. If it’s not pourable, add more milk or some water in small doses until it is. Gently pour onto your griddle and cook the bottom side until it browns (about two minutes on my griddle, but keep checking on yours). When that happens, sprinkle chocolate chips on the tops of the raw sides, flip them, and cook until done.

I’ve Got A Secret Salmon Burgers

22 Feb

Listen, gang. I’m going to share this with you because it really is just too good to keep to myself, but you cannot, under any circumstances, tell my kids what I’m about to say. Ever. That includes you, Mom.

Agreed?

Awesome, then.

For loads of us, today starts six weeks of avoiding meat on certain days. And while options are certainly way better than when I was a kid (fried fish? or pizza? which would you like?), it can still be a challenge, particularly when our kids are fixated on chicken and beef for dinner. Sure, you can bring out the pasta and the olive oil and garlic or the tomato sauce, and you can chuck some shrimp in there, but sometimes you need a meat-and-potatoes feeling dinner even when there’s no meat involved.

Enter the salmon burger. It’s hearty, it sits on a potato roll so you can eat with your hands, it feels all manly and stuff, and it’s darned healthy most of the time (check your labels! some of those salmon burgers in the freezer section are terrifying!). It’s also one of those things that’s easier to make from scratch than hassling with pre-made and frozen. And these, my lovelies, have a secret that makes them both more delicious and way healthier.

Are you ready? Because this is the part where you read in silence. Ixnay on the aringshay with the ildrenchay, capice?

The secret is this: You know how we use breadcrumbs as filler/binder in hamburgers and meatloaf and those sorts of things? These yummy meatless burgers use oats.

HA! Whole grains and fiber goodness that makes the outside of these deliciously crunchy like a “real” burger, and your kids will never suspect a thing. Eat your heart out, Jessica Seinfeld. We real-world moms have this one covered.

You’re going to use quick-cooking oats for these burgers. Don’t have those? Give regular oats a whirl in your blender or food processor to break ’em up–same difference. Mix them up in a bowl with your salmon and your egg and all the other yummies in this recipe, gently put ’em in a hot (HOT!) pan with a little olive oil, and you’ll have a meatless meal your kids and your pediatrician will love. Rock on with your bad grain-hiding self.

You’re going to start with cooked salmon, either canned (oh stop it–it’s totally fine if you read your labels) or a filet or two that you’ve cooked (any old way) and flaked up. This does two things: it makes the burger assembly easier and it ensures nobody gets any tummy nasties in the very small chance your burgers don’t cook all the way through to a specified high temperature. The rest of this is super easy.

I give you salmon burgers with a secret. Don’t go telling on me and ruin them, OK? You need:

Salmon, either a 14.75 oz can (look near the tuna at your grocery store) or a filet or two, cooked and flaked up.

1/2 cup quick-cooking oats

1 egg, lightly beaten

2 tbsp fresh dill, chopped (or 1 tbsp dried)

The juice of half a lemon

Salt and pepper

Olive oil

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat until it’s screaming hot.

In a bowl, gently stir together everything up to and including salt and pepper, flaking up the salmon as you go, until everything is looking all combined and burgery. Take a small handful of the mixture and squeeze it together–if it doesn’t hold in a ball, add a tablespoon or so of olive oil to the mix. Using your hands, form the mixture into burger patties, making sure they’re flat in the middle and that you’ve squeezed them enough that they’ll hold together.

Pop them into the fridge for a few minutes. This’ll help them hold together on the stovetop.

Once your pan is super hot, coat the bottom of it with oil. You’re not deep frying–you just want enough to stop the patties from sticking. Gently lay your burgers in the pan, giving them a little room to groove (I cooked mine in two batches). Cook them for about three minutes, gently lifting one up after that to see if it’s browning.

Once it’s brown on the cooked side, carefully flip your burgers over and let them go until they’re crunchy on both sides. Serve–we liked ours on potato rolls, but you have them however you’d like.

 

Cornbread Waffles

7 Feb

Swamped.

Again.

*Sigh*

I’ve been intrigued by the concept of corn waffles since I heard about them a few months ago. I know they’re a Big Deal in the south, where they’re usually served with fried chicken, but we’re not southern and we don’t eat fried chicken…ever. But still, I was intrigued. We like waffles and we love cornbread, and so when I found myself with a blessed hour last week, I hunkered down and made a double batch of these.

Everyone loved them. The kids declared them the best waffles ever, in fact. DS ate his with butter and DD and I had ours with a touch of maple syrup. They combine the crispy-chewy of a traditional waffle with a little bit of the inside crunch and delicious sweetness of a corn muffin.

They’re not health food. I know. I had one waffle. OK? I blog about food–it’s my duty, really. And if you can’t have a treat every so often, there’s not a lot of point in taste buds–and we are gifted with a lot of those. Don’t let ’em go to waste all the time.

This is pretty much Mark Bittman’s recipe, doubled. Use a very large bowl to mix these up. The beauty of this is that they freeze really really well and heat up nicely in the toaster, and you’ll have a nice big bag to stick in your freezer and pull a few out for breakfast every so often. That has so many advantages over store-bought frozen waffles that I can’t even begin to fit it all in here; let’s just say no chemicals, no preservatives, and no icky additives.

You will need to break out your mixer. It’ll be OK. It takes three minutes, and the results are totally worth it. Give it a try. You need (don’t freak out–like I said, this makes a huge pile o’ waffles and you’ll have a freezer stocked with ’em at the end):

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 cups cornmeal (I used finely ground)

1 tsp salt

4 tbsp sugar

6 tsp baking powder

3 cups milk

4 eggs, separated

1 stick butter, melted and cooled

1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat your waffle iron and brush it with oil if yours needs it.

Combine all the dry stuff in a big bowl–I used my huge batter bowl.

Use your electric mixer to beat up your egg whites (you need the yolks in a minute) until they look like clouds–soft and puffy and white.

Stir the milk, egg yolks, butter, and vanilla into your dry mixture. Very gently fold in your egg whites until everything is combined. Bake on your waffle iron as directed (I had mine on a medium-low setting; just keep an eye on yours if it doesn’t have a temperature selector), slightly underbaking the ones you plan to keep for later so they don’t burn when you pop them into a toaster to heat them up.

Enjoy.

My Favorite Cinnamon Bread

24 Jan

You’re thinking I said cinnamon raisin bread. But I didn’t. Raisins, as far as I’m concerned, have no business in baked goods, and especially have no business in something as perfect as this amazing, comforting, perfect loaf of yumminess.

Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, this was a recipe from the old standard Better Homes & Gardens New Cook Book that I’ve doctored up. And the doctoring has led to a slightly sweeter, slightly crunchier cinnamon bread that’s reminiscent of a cinnamon roll. Yummy for a snack, divine for breakfast, and y’all, this stuff makes some seriously kick butt French toast.

You should go make some. Right now. Before your kids get home from school, so you can enjoy the first amazing slice all by yourself. And I’m going to stop talking just so you can. You need:

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 tsp active dry yeast

2/3 cup milk

1 1/2 tbsp sugar

3 tbsp butter

1 tbsp light brown sugar

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp salt

1 egg

Another 1/4 cup brown sugar

Another 1 tsp cinnamon

Measure your milk into a Pyrex cup or microwaveable bowl. Add the regular sugar and the butter and nuke it for about a minute, until it’s warmer than body temperature but not hot.

While that’s nuking up, pour your flour, yeast, egg, brown sugar, salt, and cinnamon into your bread machine (or into the bowl of your mixer). Add the warm milk mixture and either set your bread machine for the dough cycle and walk away, or gently mix everything together, knead it with your hands or a dough hook for five minutes, put it into a greased bowl, cover it with a clean dishtowel, and let it rise until doubled, which will be about 45 minutes.

Once your bread machine is done and/or your dough has risen, heat your oven to 375 degrees and spray a loaf pan with your nonstick goodness of choice. Punch the dough down and set it on a floured countertop, and then spread a little flour on top of it too–it’s going to be sticky. Roll it out into a rectangle about as wide as your loaf pan and maybe 18 inches long.

In a small bowl, combine your 1/4 cup of brown sugar and your teaspoon of cinnamon.

Gently brush your dough with water and spread the brown sugar/cinnamon mixture all over the top of it. It’ll be a very thin layer–do not freak out. Starting with a narrow end, tightly roll the dough up and then lay the roll in your bread pan. Cover it with a clean dishtowel, give it a half-hour to rise, and then bake it for a half-hour, until it’s done.

Perfect Little Lemon Cookies

23 Jan

The weather this weekend was nothing short of disgusting–cold and wet and bone-shivering and nothing I wanted to be out in, especially with the head cold that attacked me in the middle of the grocery store yesterday morning. I left the house exactly three times: once for church and dinner out with my family, once to go to the market, and once to go to a birthday celebration lunch. That was it.

Bring on spring. And bring on my Kitchen Aid, because something about baking up a yummy treat lifts the spirit when the weather outside is nasty. This recipe fit both cravings quite nicely.

This started out as a recipe I tore out of Bon Appetit magazine. The original called for not much lemon in the actual cookies, and slathering them with lemon icing. We’re not much for iced cookies around here, and so I just bumped up the lemon in the batter itself to make a plain lemon icebox cookie.

They are tiny–I’m not going to lie to you. Each cookie is about a bite. But they are perfect little lunchbox treats and wonderful after-meal mouth refreshers, and I am in love with them. They would also be wonderful for lunch or a party with the girlfriends–you know those gatherings where you knock yourself out making food that nobody actually eats? Tiny is good for those occasions, and these are delicious.

Spring in my mouth in a perfect, tiny bite. Yes.

I hope these will brighten up a dreary day for you. You need:

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp salt

2 sticks unsalted butter, softened

3/4 cup sugar

One lemon

1 tsp vanilla extract

4 large egg yolks

In your mixer bowl, cream together the sugar and butter until it’s light and fluffy (about 2 minutes on medium in my Kitchen Aid stand mixer; more for a hand mixer). Add in the vanilla, and then the zest from your lemon and its juice (zest it, cut it in half, and squeeze the juice in). Add the egg yolks and beat them in. Mix in the flour and salt on a low speed, and just until they’re blended in.

Divide the batter in half onto two sheets of wax paper. Use your hands to form each half into a log, about 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide and a foot or so long. Wrap the logs in the wax paper and stick them in the fridge for an hour or two.

Once your dough is chilled, heat your oven to 350 degrees and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Unwrap one dough log and use a sharp knife to cut it into thin discs–mine were about 1/8 inch wide. The thinner you cut, the crisper your cookies will be. Lay them flat on your cookie sheet so they don’t touch (they don’t spread, but need some room to breathe in there). Bake them for 12-15 minutes, until they’re crisp and the bottoms have started to brown. Cool on the counter and smile.

 

 

Chicken Tortilla Soup

18 Jan

Hey gang!

I am drowning in deadlines this week. This is a good thing (we who are self employed much prefer drowning in deadlines to twiddling our thumbs), but it is presenting an extra challenge for my health eating lifestyle (day 18!). Lunch, especially, is hard. These are the days I used to grab peanut butter and white bread or a frozen entree, just to make life easy.

No more. In between editing things on Monday, I whipped up a batch of Mango & Tomato’s Chicken Tortilla Soup, and I’ve been eating it for lunch every day. It is delicious–creamy without the cream, satisfying without fat and salt, and wonderfully comforting when the cold wind blows outside my window.

I’m not going to repost her recipe–it’s hers, after all–but I’ll tell you a few things I did differently, just because my pantry didn’t cooperate on Monday. I didn’t have fire-roasted tomatoes, so I used regular diced tomatoes and added about a tablespoon of smoked chipotle Tabasco, which is one of my top 3 condiments–not hot, but deliciously smoky. I also didn’t have fresh corn, so I added a can of rinsed salt-free kernels, and I used a can of rinsed black beans as well.

I did make the chicken the way she suggests, plain in a cast-iron skillet until it got delicously brown and crunchy, and I have a new favorite way to make chicken for soups and salads now. It is so very simple and absolutely delicious, and it added a ton of flavor to my pot of soup. I also used my immersion blender as she suggests; they are cheap and a nice investment if you don’t have one. You could, of course, use a regular blender or food processor, but blending it in the pot is so much easier that I recommend it if you can make it happen.

I am having more of this for lunch today, and I can’t wait. Thank you, Mango & Tomato!

Rockfish with Spanish-Style Tomato Sauce and Olives

3 Jan

Happy January!

I hope everyone had a lovely holiday! Did you get any fun kitchen toys? I received a beautiful Cuisinart waffle iron and a very pretty antique wood mortar and pestle, both of which I love. Share in the comments what you received–I can’t wait to hear!

So. A new year. And like a lot of families, we’re trying hard to eat healthier. I pulled some rockfish out of the freezer yesterday morning and pondered how to make it for a few hours, and came up with this–a Spanish-style tomato sauce with black olives and sweet roasted peppers that was delicious. It would work over any kind of white fish, and would also be delicious over chicken, I think (or by using it as a simmer sauce for chunks of fish or chicken, and then serving that over rice). We enjoyed our fish over Spanish rice and everyone seemed to really like it.

I started pulling spices out of my drawer for this and remembered that I had a bottle of Mexican Seasoning from The Spice Hunter, so I used that instead. It was delicious. If you don’t want to invest in another spice mix, use chili powder and oregano and maybe a little paprika.

I also used a pinch of saffron in this sauce. Before you freak out–because who’s not heard that saffron is the world’s most expensive spice–I got a little jar of it for a few dollars at Trader Joe’s, and I quite literally used just a pinch. Saffron adds a lot of depth to tomato-based sauces and that tiny bit does make a difference, but you won’t ever pick the flavor out from tasting the sauce. I recommend buying some and keeping it in your freezer for pinches here and there, but you can certainly leave it out if you’d rather.

Roasted red peppers make an appearance in this dish–I used about half of a small jar and chopped them up before stirring them into the sauce. My family all thought they were tomatoes until I filled them in. The dish would be delicious without them, too, so go either way on that.

This fed all four of us and I have a little bit left over that I’m waffling between having for lunch today and sharing with DH tonight. Either way, I am going to make a double batch of this sauce and keep it in the freezer for those crazy hurricane days, when I can pull some chicken or fish out of the cold box along with some sauce and simmer them together for a quick, easy dinner. (Too busy for this for a weeknight meal? Make the sauce one day and refrigerate it for another, when you can just start with the lay the protein in the pan step. Easy peasy.)

This is absolutely being added to our regular meal rotation, and I hope you’ll give it a try as part of your own healthier new year. You need:

1 tbsp olive oil

About a pound of fish or chicken, cut into about 3-inch strips

1/4 cup finely diced onion

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1 1/2 tsp Mexican seasoning (or the substitute above)

A pinch of salt

A pinch of saffron

14 oz can of tomato sauce

4 oz can of sliced black olives (or about a quarter-cup of fresh sliced olives)

About 2 tbsp roasted red peppers, sliced

Salt and pepper

In a small saucepan, heat the olive oil over a medium burner. Add the onions with a pinch of salt¬† and cook until they’re soft and translucent. Stir in the garlic and Mexican seasoning and keep it moving for about 30 seconds, until that garlic starts to smell good. Then stir in the sauce and saffron, lower your burner to medium-low, and simmer for about 15 minutes. Stir in the olives and red peppers, remove the sauce from the heat, and either refrigerate for another day or keep going to make the whole meal.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Spray a small baking dish with olive oil or nonstick spray (I used an 11 x 7 inch Pyrex dish). Lay your fish or chicken in the dish so the pieces don’t overlap:

Sparingly salt and pepper your protein, and then pour the sauce over the pieces evenly.

Cover with foil and bake until it’s cooked (140 degrees for fish, 165 degrees for chicken–use a meat thermometer and spare yourself food poisoning).¬† My fish pieces were about two inches thick and took about 35 minutes to cook. Carefully remove the foil (watch the steam!) and enjoy.

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